Going Coastal
black-culture:

black-culture:

Tonight in Ferguson. 
Ferguson Women on the Frontlines: Our Voices, Our Stories is tomorrow at 7pm at Wellsprings Church in Ferguson 

Please reblog. Hopefully women from STL can see this and attend!

The hashtag for @MillennialAU #Ferguson Women on the Frontlines: Our Voices, Our Stories is #MAUwomen follow the dialogue tonight at 7pm

black-culture:

black-culture:

Tonight in Ferguson.
Ferguson Women on the Frontlines: Our Voices, Our Stories is tomorrow at 7pm at Wellsprings Church in Ferguson

Please reblog. Hopefully women from STL can see this and attend!

The hashtag for @MillennialAU #Ferguson Women on the Frontlines: Our Voices, Our Stories is #MAUwomen follow the dialogue tonight at 7pm

pervocracy:

tranqualizer:

we need to stop idealizing “speaking out” to the point where victims/survivors feel coerced to share their traumatic experiences around sexualized violence because they feel like they need to prove that they deserve support for being “brave enough” to speak out…

atane:

"I want a community-policing worldview," Bill de Blasio told New York Magazine last year,referring to the differences between his NYPD and Mayor Bloomberg’s. “I want to fundamentally reform our current approach.” Seven months after de Blasio took office, his police force is arresting more New Yorkers for low-level offenses than his predecessor’s—and the vast majority of those petty arrests continue to involve people of color.

From January through July 2014, the NYPD made 137,039 misdemeanor arrests, compared with 136,208 over the same time period in 2013. The most common charge was theft, followed by assault, then criminal possession of marijuana.

Of all marijuana-related arrests, 90% involved people of color, compared with 90.1% of arrests occurring in 2013; 90% of all trespass arrests this year involved people of color.

The numbers were obtained from the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services by the Police Reform Organizing Project, a group that has pointed to the similarities between De Blasio and Bloomberg’s policing styles since June.

"De Blasio and Bratton pay lip service to the idea of community policing, but having meetings with high level clergy like Rev. Al Sharpton or Cardinal Dolan, that’s all window dressing," says Robert Gangi, the director of PROP.

"There’s an undeniable, stark racial bias in these low-level arrests," Gangi adds. "It sounds almost exaggerated, but it’s true: the vast majority of police resources are focused on ticketing people or arresting people engaging in low-level infractions."

As part of his "All Out" initiative earlier this summer, Commissioner Bratton and Chief of Department Philip Banks III announced that cops would be required to chat with residents and go about “generating contacts.”

"They’re gonna be knocking on doors to see how [the NYPD] is doing. The residents of New York City will see more police officers on the street," Banks said.

Bratton told us last month, ”Overall trending on marijuana related issues in the city is in fact down, it will continue to go down,” but the number of marijuana-related arrests have essentially remained the same for the first seven months of 2014 compared with 2014. Arrests for marijuana possession dropped slightly from 17,630 to 17,117, despite the fact that for the final month counted, the Brooklyn DA Ken Thompson essentially decriminalized the offense in the city’s most populous borough.

A spokesman for the de Blasio administration predicted that the mayor would address the PROP numbers shortly—we’ll update if this happens.

triplegoddesss:

Me as a mermaid

triplegoddesss:

Me as a mermaid

zubat:

arctogaeal:

PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST THIS!!!!

Please help spread awareness!!!!!!!!


Find this child!

zubat:

arctogaeal:

PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST THIS!!!!

Please help spread awareness!!!!!!!!

Find this child!

america-wakiewakie:

Marissa Alexander was sentenced to prison after firing a warning shot to protect herself from her abusive husband.

Last week, domestic violence was front-page news in America as the video of Baltimore Ravens player Ray Rice beating his partner circulated online. Sunday morning news shows interviewed domestic violence survivors, social workers at domestic violence agencies, and even police chiefs about their departments’ policies around domestic violence calls.

But in all this discussion about the realities of domestic violence, one perspective was clearly left out: the people who are imprisoned for defending themselves against abusers. Where are the stories about how the legal system often punishes abuse survivors for defending themselves, usually after the legal system itself failed to ensure their safety?

Many readers already know the name Marissa Alexander, the Florida mother of three who was arrested for firing a warning shot to dissuade her abusive husband from assaulting her. In 2012, Alexander was found guilty of aggravated assault and was given a 20 year sentence. Her sentencing coincided with the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, drawing wider public attention than she might have received otherwise. People across the country rallied to her defense, organizing fundraisers and teach-ins and bringing media attention to the injustice of her case. Alexander appealed her case and was granted a new trial, which is scheduled to start in December 2014. The prosecutor has said that, this time, she will seek a sixty-year sentence for Alexander if she is convicted again.

While awaiting her new legal ordeal, Marissa Alexander is allowed to be home with two of her three children. (Her estranged husband, the same one who had assaulted her and then called the police on her, has custody of her youngest child.) If it weren’t for that outpouring of support nationwide, Marissa Alexander might very well still be in prison on that original twenty-year sentence.

We know Marissa Alexander’s name, but there are countless other abuse survivors behind prison walls whose names and stories we do not know. We actually do not know how many women are imprisoned for defending themselves against their abusers. No agency or organization seems to keep track of this information. Prison systems do not. Court systems do not. The U.S. Department of Justice has some data on intimate partner violence, but not about how often this violence is a significant factor in the woman’s incarceration. In California, a prison study found that 93 percent of the women who had killed their significant others had been abused by them. That study found that 67 percent of those women reported that they had been attempting to protect themselves or their children when they wound up killing their partner. In New York State, 67 percent of women sent to prison for killing someone close to them were abused by that person. But these are just two specific studies; no governmental agency collects data on how frequently abuse plays a direct role to prison nationwide.

This past Sunday morning, an ABC news segment reported that 70 percent of domestic violence calls do not end in prosecution. That story stressed how many abused people choose not to press charges against their loved ones. Not mentioned, however, is how often systems fail to help survivors when they doseek help. Domestic violence survivors have reported that, time and again, they sought help—from family members, from their communities, from domestic violence agencies and from police. Many times, they found that help was unavailable to them. As we collectively wring our hands about domestic violence, shelters for people seeking help remain grossly underfunded. Passing the Violence Against Women Act (which relies heavily on criminalization and arrest, both problematic for women of color and other marginalized people) required a monumental political effort. 

(Read Full Text)

Oklahoma Police Officer, Suspected Racist and Suspected Rapist Daniel Holtzclaw has been arrested and charged with raping and/or molesting at least eight black females. Just like Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown, Jr.’s killers, Whites invested in Holtzclaw; an alleged White sexual predator raked in approximately $10,000 in roughly three days. His bond was subsequently lowered and he’s been released to house arrest. Thus far, Daniele Watts has received more attention and harsher treatment. And it’s undisputed that she’s raped no one.

These incidents reflect White values. These concurrent events offer additional evidence of the global empire of White Supremacy, White Terrorism. Sexual exploitation of non-white people is a persistent, undeniable and essential component of White amusement and domination.
"Interracial Relationships" Are SADD 3.0 by Gus T. Renegade, host of the counter-racist broadcast The COWS (via x09)